transparency

Global Pound Conference Berlin

Global Pound Conference Berlin

The Berlin Global Pound Conference, held on 24 March 2017 at the International Chamber of Commerce in the heart of the capital, was the first I had attended in the series of 39 worldwide events. The conference brought together an effective representation of Germany’s dispute resolution community, with handpicked in-house and external lawyers, institutional representatives, ADR specialists, academics and others, all stakeholders were well represented. Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in GPC, News
Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in Ask An Expert, GPC
Ask An Expert: Joe Liu

Ask An Expert: Joe Liu

Joe Liu, Managing Counsel at the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, speaks about transparency, education and trends in Asia’s dispute resolution market. Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in Ask An Expert, GPC
Evaluating Arbitrators: You Be The Judge

Evaluating Arbitrators: You Be The Judge

In 2007/8, I set up a now long-since defunct website (disputesloop.com) with the lofty aim of introducing some transparency into the appointment process of ADR neutrals. At its core, the site offered a battery of neutrals’ CVs supplemented with free-form written feedback from users. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Introductory Guide
Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Reacting to a discussion at Vienna Arbitration Days 2016, Lucy Greenwood, Michael McIlwrath and I published an article ‘Puppies or Kittens – How To Better Match Arbitrators to Party Expectations’ calling for better-informed choices in appointing arbitrators.

We analysed the arbitrator selection process, and proposed that the lack of available information on arbitrator’s soft skills and procedural preferences often leaves parties disappointed.

In appointing an arbitrator a party seeks to identify an individual with an approach to procedural issues, case management and handling of evidence and settlement which aligns with the party’s views. While this information is crucial for the arbitrator selection, parties have only traces of knowledge about it. In fact, obtaining this information can be the single most difficult challenge when identifying potential arbitrators. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News
The Geneva GPC – Does The Future Lie In Mediation?

The Geneva GPC – Does The Future Lie In Mediation?

On 29 September 2016, various stakeholders from the judicial and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) community – arbitrators, mediators and judges, in-house counsel, external lawyers, policy-makers as well as representatives of arbitral institutions – gathered in sunny Geneva for a lively exchange on “the future of dispute resolution” at the city’s GPC event. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News
Some Thoughts On CETA

Some Thoughts On CETA

High drama this week, with CETA, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement between Canada and the EU, first blocked by the Walloons, and then rescued following some marathon diplomacy (or inconsequential fudge, depending on your perspective). Had the Walloon parliament voted against the agreement, Belgium would have been prevented from agreeing to it, thus the unanimous agreement of EU states needed to sign would have failed, and so would the ratification of the deal. Read more

Posted by Peter Boyle in GPC, Opinion
Ask An Expert: Paul Key QC

Ask An Expert: Paul Key QC

New Zealand born Paul Key QC, an international arbitration specialist at Essex Court Chambers in London, discusses innovation, challenges and new trends in dispute resolution.

 What is your role in dispute resolution?

I am a barrister based in London. I work as an advocate and as an arbitrator in international commercial arbitrations and investment treaty arbitrations. I also do court work, largely (though not exclusively) related to arbitral disputes.

The disputes in which I am involved usually have some high-value and cross-border commercial aspect to them. My clients are typically large commercial entities, states and very high net-worth individuals. Like most people who do this work, my work as an advocate involves work for both claimants and respondents. The arbitrations in which I am involved take place in various places around the world (e.g. New York, Geneva, Singapore, Vienna and Sydney) and my work involves frequent travel. Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in Ask An Expert, GPC
It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

As a largely private mechanism for dispute resolution, international commercial arbitration has been shielded from scrutiny in relation to the composition of its arbitral tribunals. For years, the arbitration institutions did not publish data in relation to the gender, nationality or race of arbitrators appointed to hear disputes. However, this situation is changing. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News
When arbitration is used and why

When arbitration is used and why

In almost all instances, arbitration must be contemplated at the contract drafting stage. Parties may, of course, agree to take a dispute to arbitration at any stage, but once a dispute has broken out, positions become polarised, and agreement is accordingly less likely.

The reasons for preferring arbitration clauses to the more usual reference to the courts – in a commercial context – boil down to the so-called “three Es”: expedition, expertise and enforcement. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Introductory Guide
Secrets of a Global Super Court – A Second Look

Secrets of a Global Super Court – A Second Look

Regardless if you see it as being catastrophic or simply weird, for many and varied reasons, 2016 looks set to be a most memorable year. For arbitration lawyers, it could be marked as the year in which investor-state arbitration became a talking point. How do we know this? Well, because 2016 was the year in which BuzzFeed – otherwise known for pop culture, listicles, and lots and lots of cats – published a four part series on investor state dispute settlement (ISDS), entitled Secrets of a Global Super Court.

Amplifying the sense of injustice suggested by the title, the article opens with an invitation to “Imagine a private, global super court that empowers corporations to bend countries to their will. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Opinion