conflict resolution

The Global Pound Conference = A Global Workshop

The Global Pound Conference = A Global Workshop

I spent the past year helping organise the Florence GPC, which took place on 9 June 2017. The experience has been inspiring and even thrilling. Above all, it has changed how I think about dispute resolution.

In order to engage different stakeholders, I often found myself explain what the GPC is, what it aims to accomplish, and how it is going about its mission.  Local institutions, speakers, chairs, potential sponsors, mediators and all the people which I have spoken to have been fascinated by the initiative, but often requiring at least 20 minutes of explanation.

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Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Introductory Guide
The Ingenious Judge – A Children’s Book

The Ingenious Judge – A Children’s Book

Judge Luciana Breggia, President of the second section of the Tribunal of Florence, offers an insight into her illustrated book ‘Il Giudice alla Rovescia (The Ingenious Judge)’ which seeks to teach children about the foundations of justice, as well as essential skills in resolving conflict.

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Posted by Natasha Mellersh in GPC
Advocating Alternative Political Resolution

Advocating Alternative Political Resolution

I proposed the idea of alternative political resolution (APR) in a 2015 blog post about potential future developments in mediation. Now I’d like to explore the idea in more detail in light of the Global Pound Conference Series and related discussions about shaping the future of dispute resolution. I imagine APR as a process by which politicians with different views engage with each other, confidentially, with the help of an impartial third party, and work out policy or legislation solutions that satisfy all sides of the political debate. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News
Nelson Mandela As Negotiator: What Can We Learn From Him?

Nelson Mandela As Negotiator: What Can We Learn From Him?

This article considers how ‘the greatest negotiator of the twentieth century’, Nelson Mandela, approached negotiating the ‘unbanning’ of the African National Congress (ANC), the dismantling of apartheid, and his own freedom after 27 years of imprisonment.

He employed classically good negotiation practices in the face of intense and violent opposition while confined in prison for life. If he could be successful, why can lawyers not succeed in the same way when facing less daunting disputes?

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Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News