Brexit

A Moment In The Drizzle: Could Brexit Represent An Opportunity For Arbitration?

A Moment In The Drizzle: Could Brexit Represent An Opportunity For Arbitration?

A trigger that came with more warnings than the Daily Mail in a post-colonial gender studies course, the formal notification of Article 50 has brought into relief the fact that the EU-UK legal framework is moving swiftly towards the Rumsfeld paradigm: “There are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we now know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we do not know we don’t know”. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Opinion
Can We Still Be Friends? London As A Global Seat Of Arbitration Post-Brexit

Can We Still Be Friends? London As A Global Seat Of Arbitration Post-Brexit

Michael McIlwrath, Global Chief Litigation Counsel for GE Oil & Gas opened his recent article An Unamicable Separation: Brexit Consequences for London as a Premier Seat of International Dispute Resolution in Europe with the following quote, attributed to the most prolific of all authors, ‘unknown’:

“I try not to think of divorce as failing at marriage but rather winning at bitterness and resentment.” Read more

Posted by Peter Boyle in GPC, Opinion
The End Of Free Trade?

The End Of Free Trade?

With the fallout from the recent US election, many are feeling uneasy about the year ahead. Rising nationalism in Europe, along with a growing protectionist trend towards international trade are certainly a cause for concern. Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in GPC, Opinion
London After Brexit: Business As Usual?

London After Brexit: Business As Usual?

Reading the headlines, Brexit-ing Britain may appear a hostile place – the public, we are told, favours being told the number of foreigners being employed by companies in Britain, and academics at the London School of Economics find that they are debarred from giving their non-British opinion on Brexit, lest, one assumes, they steal bread from the mouths of native political scientists.

It would be careless, therefore, for lawyers not to ask what impact Brexit would have on the UK as a seat of arbitration. As it stands, the UK- or more specifically, London – is clearly an attractive seat for arbitration proceedings, being the home of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, the London Court of International Arbitration, and the London Maritime Arbitrators Association. Read more

Posted by Peter Boyle in GPC, News