appointment process

Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Ask An Expert: Lucy Greenwood

Lucy Greenwood, an independent International Arbitrator based in Houston, Texas, provides her insight into the the issues of transparency, data and diversity in the international arbitration field.

What is your current role?

After spending the past 20 years in practice with two major international law firms, I have recently transitioned to become a full time arbitrator.

I joined Linklaters as a trainee in 1996, qualified as a litigator in London in 1998 and rather fell into the practice of international arbitration shortly thereafter. The firm needed an associate to relocate with a partner to the Paris office to establish an international arbitration presence there and asked me to go.  Read more

Posted by Natasha Mellersh in Ask An Expert, GPC
Evaluating Arbitrators: You Be The Judge

Evaluating Arbitrators: You Be The Judge

In 2007/8, I set up a now long-since defunct website (disputesloop.com) with the lofty aim of introducing some transparency into the appointment process of ADR neutrals. At its core, the site offered a battery of neutrals’ CVs supplemented with free-form written feedback from users. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Introductory Guide
Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Matching Arbitrators To Party Expectations

Reacting to a discussion at Vienna Arbitration Days 2016, Lucy Greenwood, Michael McIlwrath and I published an article ‘Puppies or Kittens – How To Better Match Arbitrators to Party Expectations’ calling for better-informed choices in appointing arbitrators.

We analysed the arbitrator selection process, and proposed that the lack of available information on arbitrator’s soft skills and procedural preferences often leaves parties disappointed.

In appointing an arbitrator a party seeks to identify an individual with an approach to procedural issues, case management and handling of evidence and settlement which aligns with the party’s views. While this information is crucial for the arbitrator selection, parties have only traces of knowledge about it. In fact, obtaining this information can be the single most difficult challenge when identifying potential arbitrators. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News
Are hostile mediators more effective?

Are hostile mediators more effective?

New research by Francesca Gino and Ting Zhang of Columbia Business School, along with Mike Norton of Harvard Business School, suggests that the most effective mediation style might be being partial against both parties.

The academics suggest that, contrary to the received wisdom that mediators should be neutral, attentive and empathetic, an actively hostile mediator is more likely to get a good result. They discovered that a mediator’s antagonistic and hostile treatment of both parties causes adversaries to unite against the mediator, which in turn increases the parties’ willingness and propensity to reach agreement. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, Introductory Guide
It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

It’s A Numbers Game: Diversity And Inclusion In International Dispute Resolution

As a largely private mechanism for dispute resolution, international commercial arbitration has been shielded from scrutiny in relation to the composition of its arbitral tribunals. For years, the arbitration institutions did not publish data in relation to the gender, nationality or race of arbitrators appointed to hear disputes. However, this situation is changing. Read more

Posted by GPC Series in GPC, News